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Ovarian Cancer makes up 1.3% of all cancers each year, with an average 5 year survival rate of 46.2% (this is all stages combined). The survival rate has only slightly decreased over the last 40 years when compared to other cancers, mainly due to the lack of advanced screening options and improved treatment options.  What if women were more aware of what they needed to be looking for, could more cases be caught in the earlier stages (currently 15% are caught at this stage)?

The average age of a woman diagnosed with this deadly disease is 63 years of age.  The percentage of women age 35-44 diagnosed annually is 6.9%.

Hi! I’m Randalynn, mother of two beautiful children and diagnosed at age 36 as one of the 6.9% mentioned above. My outlook on the situation – “I’ve Got This!”. I’m one of the lucky ones, the 15% caught in the earlier stages. And by “lucky”, I mean the word “cured” in my future is a good possibility…doesn’t mean I don’t have a long road ahead of me.

Join me in my journey from start to finish, and beyond.  My hope is to help others in my shoes, those who aren’t the typical Ovarian Cancer patient   And also to create awareness so women know what to look for – “did you have any symptoms?” is one of the most common questions I get asked.  Yes, I did…almost all of them, but I pushed them aside.

I’m ready to Kick Ovarian Cancer’s Ass!!

We are currently about to kick off our annual fundraising efforts for Ovarian Cancer Awareness month – check out our “about us” and “teal ribbon hats” tabs on the menu for more information.

 

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Let’s Talk About That Family Pic — It’s Your Choice!

Yeah…let’s talk about that family picture, the one above,  I posted on Thursday…I know, I’ve looked at it multiple times too.  Being me, and knowing what’s going on, let me breakdown what each of us is thinking individually and collectively: ME (as we snap the pic): Hurry up, hurry up, let’s do this before he starts …

About

January 19, 2017, the day I left my “before cancer” life behind and received the news I had ovarian cancer. Although I’d prepared myself for the worst, I don’t think you’re ever prepared for that kind of news. At age 36, I was diagnosed with Stage 1C1 ovarian cancer, nothing I ever saw coming, hit us all out of nowhere.

The pastel teal hat is my “signature” color #11 AND this is treatment #6 with my “Mommas” – I made it!

6 rounds of chemo later, I’m still standing and I’m here to break the silence and create awareness about this silent killer. I’m a part-time single mom of 2, now 37 years old, and it’s crazy to me that we don’t have a reliable test in place to screen for ovarian cancer.

With Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month upon us I’ve set a new goal for myself – selling hats (which are FANTASTIC – soft and comfortable if you’ve lost your hair) in order to raise funds for research, education and care packages. How many, you might ask — a few — My goal is simple, selling 22,440 hats in 2017, representing the number of anticipated women who will be diagnosed this year.  Everyone needs a push goal, right??? I have one as well, an additional 14,080 honoring those who will lose their battle this year as well.

Black Clover is selling the hats to us at cost, resulting in $13+ per sale going directly to the initiatives mentioned above.  If BOTH the goal AND push goal are met, that’s $438,000 raised to break the silence on Ovarian Cancer!  Am I crazy?  Maybe, but let’s be honest, that number is completely achievable and we could possibly blow it out of the water!

Who will be receiving the funds?  That’s an excellent question – some sales will go directly to specific organizations who are helping promote the campaign.  The funds remaining in the “general pool” will be distributed to ovarian cancer organizations who’ve applied for funding for initiatives they have for the 2018 calendar year.

Let’s work together and show Ovarian Cancer who’s boss and blow this campaign out of the water! For more information, click the “teal ribbon hats” tab in the top menu bar.

Contact

Email:  kickovariancancer@gmail.com

Resources

Ovarian Cancer Fact Sheet – American Cancer Society

 

Helpful Links About Ovarian Cancer:  

What is Ovarian Cancer –  https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/about/what-is-ovarian-cancer.html

Signs and Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer – https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/detection-diagnosis-staging/signs-and-symptoms.html

How is Ovarian Cancer Diagnosed – https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/detection-diagnosis-staging/how-diagnosed.html

Key Stats About Ovarian Cancer  – https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/about/key-statistics.html

What’s New In Ovarian Cancer and Research – https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/about/new-research.html

https://www.cancer.org/latest-news/ovarian-cancer-researcher-aims-to-find-new-treatment.html

Causes, Risk Factors and Prevention  https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/causes-risks-prevention.html

 

Newly Diagnosed Ovarian Cancer Patient Resources:

What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Ovarian Cancer https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/detection-diagnosis-staging/talking-with-doctor.html

How is Ovarian Cancer Staged  https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/detection-diagnosis-staging/staging.html

Treating Ovarian Cancer https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/treating.html

 

What Happens After Treatment – Living As a Cancer Survivor:

After Ovarian Cancer Treatment  https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/after-treatment/follow-up.html

Lifestyle Changes After Ovarian Cancer https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/after-treatment/lifestyle-changes.html

Affects on Your Emotional Health   https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/after-treatment/lifestyle-changes.html

 

Support Group Resources 

Helping Your Children When You Have Cancer https://www.cancer.org/treatment/children-and-cancer/when-a-family-member-has-cancer.html

Online Communities and Support   https://www.cancer.org/treatment/support-programs-and-services/online-communities.html

Understanding Your Diagnosis  https://www.cancer.org/treatment/understanding-your-diagnosis.html